Sunday, Dec 15, 2019
HomeTalking Tips How managers can get maximum team performance

How managers can get maximum team performance

Many managers may not understand the value of building rapport with those who report to them. However, this is a critical key to helping them shine in their own position and it makes the job so much easier. You can choose your management style. Some leaders rely on their position to get people to perform. This can work to get the job done. We see it every day. Through intimidation, they coerce their team, and because people need their jobs, they will often put up with a boss they loathe until they can do better.

I have heard the declaration, “I’m not here to make friends. I’m here to do a job.” In essence this is true, but studies have shown productivity increases in a friendly atmosphere. As the one in charge, do you want people who give just enough to keep the job, or people who go above and beyond because you inspire them to do so?

There was a time when the draconian management style was commonplace. However, in today’s environment savvy leaders realize the need for style adjustment.

A study published in the Leadership and Organization Development Journal, Southern Cross University differentiates the characteristics between the Baby Boomers and Generation X. A notable distinction is their lifestyle values. Baby Boomers are loyal to their employers, while Generation X is loyal to their professions.

What are the implications of how they respond to management style? Baby Boomers look to be directed, while Gen X looks to be developed, Gen Y values a work-life balance. Today’s manager has to manage multiple generations. The way they can get so much more from all generations is to get to know them as individuals. What are their strengths, weaknesses, professional goals and values? Leverage their strengths, help them to develop where they are weak, play a role in helping them to reach their goals and respect their values. This is how you build rapport. Rapport is mutual respect and trust; and usually we like those we respect and trust.

If your staff doesn’t feel confident you have their best interest at heart, they probably won’t like you. If they don’t like you, they will probably hold back from giving you their extra. How much would your team’s overall performance increase if they were not just doing their job, but taking ownership and giving extra? When the team knows their leader understands them and is looking out for them, they will usually reciprocate. A Harvard University study cited that this type of leader develops teams that actually perform to make the leader look good. Would that make your job easier? They call the style charismatic.

When working with organizations, I often witness the disconnect team leaders have when it comes to people management skills. They kill the proverbial goose that is laying the golden egg. Invest in developing genuine rapport and take a sincere interest in your people.

Rapport is not about trying to be liked or allowing people to get away with murder. Rapport establishes a relationship that lends to honest feedback without fear of backlash and earns you the leverage to stretch your people to perform beyond their limits.

 

• Kim Welcome is the CEO of Influential Voice, a communication trainer and coach; she assists businesses and professionals to achieve their goals by helping them to develop deliberate, skillful, polished communication skills. Contact: kimwelcome@influentialvoice.comkimwelcome@influentialvoice.com#mce_temp_url# or call 242-225-9013.

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HomeTalking Tips How managers can get maximum team performance

How managers can get maximum team performance

Many managers may not understand the value of building rapport with those who report to them. However, this is a critical key to helping them shine in their own position and it makes the job so much easier. You can choose your management style. Some leaders rely on their position to get people to perform. This can work to get the job done. We see it every day. Through intimidation, they coerce their team, and because people need their jobs, they will often put up with a boss they loathe until they can do better.

I have heard the declaration, “I’m not here to make friends. I’m here to do a job.” In essence this is true, but studies have shown productivity increases in a friendly atmosphere. As the one in charge, do you want people who give just enough to keep the job, or people who go above and beyond because you inspire them to do so?

There was a time when the draconian management style was commonplace. However, in today’s environment savvy leaders realize the need for style adjustment.

A study published in the Leadership and Organization Development Journal, Southern Cross University differentiates the characteristics between the Baby Boomers and Generation X. A notable distinction is their lifestyle values. Baby Boomers are loyal to their employers, while Generation X is loyal to their professions.

What are the implications of how they respond to management style? Baby Boomers look to be directed, while Gen X looks to be developed, Gen Y values a work-life balance. Today’s manager has to manage multiple generations. The way they can get so much more from all generations is to get to know them as individuals. What are their strengths, weaknesses, professional goals and values? Leverage their strengths, help them to develop where they are weak, play a role in helping them to reach their goals and respect their values. This is how you build rapport. Rapport is mutual respect and trust; and usually we like those we respect and trust.

If your staff doesn’t feel confident you have their best interest at heart, they probably won’t like you. If they don’t like you, they will probably hold back from giving you their extra. How much would your team’s overall performance increase if they were not just doing their job, but taking ownership and giving extra? When the team knows their leader understands them and is looking out for them, they will usually reciprocate. A Harvard University study cited that this type of leader develops teams that actually perform to make the leader look good. Would that make your job easier? They call the style charismatic.

When working with organizations, I often witness the disconnect team leaders have when it comes to people management skills. They kill the proverbial goose that is laying the golden egg. Invest in developing genuine rapport and take a sincere interest in your people.

Rapport is not about trying to be liked or allowing people to get away with murder. Rapport establishes a relationship that lends to honest feedback without fear of backlash and earns you the leverage to stretch your people to perform beyond their limits.

 

• Kim Welcome is the CEO of Influential Voice, a communication trainer and coach; she assists businesses and professionals to achieve their goals by helping them to develop deliberate, skillful, polished communication skills. Contact: kimwelcome@influentialvoice.comkimwelcome@influentialvoice.com#mce_temp_url# or call 242-225-9013.

Latest posts by The Nassau Guardian (see all)

FOLLOW US ON:
Nassau Conference to
Louise Cooper Center
HomeTalking Tips How managers can get maximum team performance

How managers can get maximum team performance

Many managers may not understand the value of building rapport with those who report to them. However, this is a critical key to helping them shine in their own position and it makes the job so much easier. You can choose your management style. Some leaders rely on their position to get people to perform. This can work to get the job done. We see it every day. Through intimidation, they coerce their team, and because people need their jobs, they will often put up with a boss they loathe until they can do better.

I have heard the declaration, “I’m not here to make friends. I’m here to do a job.” In essence this is true, but studies have shown productivity increases in a friendly atmosphere. As the one in charge, do you want people who give just enough to keep the job, or people who go above and beyond because you inspire them to do so?

There was a time when the draconian management style was commonplace. However, in today’s environment savvy leaders realize the need for style adjustment.

A study published in the Leadership and Organization Development Journal, Southern Cross University differentiates the characteristics between the Baby Boomers and Generation X. A notable distinction is their lifestyle values. Baby Boomers are loyal to their employers, while Generation X is loyal to their professions.

What are the implications of how they respond to management style? Baby Boomers look to be directed, while Gen X looks to be developed, Gen Y values a work-life balance. Today’s manager has to manage multiple generations. The way they can get so much more from all generations is to get to know them as individuals. What are their strengths, weaknesses, professional goals and values? Leverage their strengths, help them to develop where they are weak, play a role in helping them to reach their goals and respect their values. This is how you build rapport. Rapport is mutual respect and trust; and usually we like those we respect and trust.

If your staff doesn’t feel confident you have their best interest at heart, they probably won’t like you. If they don’t like you, they will probably hold back from giving you their extra. How much would your team’s overall performance increase if they were not just doing their job, but taking ownership and giving extra? When the team knows their leader understands them and is looking out for them, they will usually reciprocate. A Harvard University study cited that this type of leader develops teams that actually perform to make the leader look good. Would that make your job easier? They call the style charismatic.

When working with organizations, I often witness the disconnect team leaders have when it comes to people management skills. They kill the proverbial goose that is laying the golden egg. Invest in developing genuine rapport and take a sincere interest in your people.

Rapport is not about trying to be liked or allowing people to get away with murder. Rapport establishes a relationship that lends to honest feedback without fear of backlash and earns you the leverage to stretch your people to perform beyond their limits.

 

• Kim Welcome is the CEO of Influential Voice, a communication trainer and coach; she assists businesses and professionals to achieve their goals by helping them to develop deliberate, skillful, polished communication skills. Contact: kimwelcome@influentialvoice.comkimwelcome@influentialvoice.com#mce_temp_url# or call 242-225-9013.

Latest posts by The Nassau Guardian (see all)

FOLLOW US ON:
Nassau Conference to
Louise Cooper Center