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Pastor Gibson: Love the skin you’re in

First Assembly pastor encourages people to appreciate their uniqueness as he completes decade of service in Abaco

Love the skin you are in as it pertains to the first family being an example before God’s people is the number one take away in lessons learnt by Pastor Dr. A. Deion Gibson as he completes his 10-year pastoral assignment at First Assembly Church of God, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, as he prepares to move on to his next assignment

“Always appreciate your uniqueness as an individual and a family,” said Gibson. “Although it may be totally different from everyone around you, God has made you special because God desires to maximize what he has placed in you.”

Gibson and his wife Anette, will be recognized at a farewell celebration on Sunday, August 26 at 3 p.m. at the Murphy Town Community Center under the theme “A Pastor According to God’s Heart.”

And as he awaits his next assignment he said that he and his wife would continue to give themselves to prayers and devotion to God.

“We will walk through doors of ministry and work opportunities that God will strategically place along our path,” he said.

As for the advice he would emphasize to an up and coming pastor regarding his wife and their immediate family that would save them from ministry heartaches, Gibson said it would entail committing their life to prayer and fasting, listening with sincerity to constructive criticism and taking wise counsel from elders and leaders. This is because those individuals are there to protect them and their family from the frontline fire of ministry church gossip. He would also recommend taking time out for family, and for the pastor to listen to his wife.

For Gibson, love, fidelity and family planning are three subjects that must be discussed prior to committing into a marital covenant.

This from the pastor who officiated approximately 30 weddings between 2008 and 2018; christened/dedicated approximately 120 children; baptized approximately 80 people; and conducted approximately 15 eulogies.

He said the lessons he learnt during his decade of pastoral encounters and the advice he doled out would certainly assist any pastor’s efficiency and effectiveness.

Gibson is a member of the Assemblies of God, Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands, a Pentecostal organization headed by Dr. Patrick Paul, general superintendent.

The Assembly began its work and ministry in The Bahamas in 1928. Throughout its decades long history, the church has grown tremendously.

As he prepares to depart Abaco, the pastor said he was leaving a community of God-fearing, friendly and inquisitive people.

He also spoke to “prophetically receiving a word” for the lyrics which were written into a song by Pastor Jerome Hill that says “Tie my hands, Tie my feet, Blindfold me, Lead me Lord, I trust you, Lead me on” – a song which says to the “spirit” of a believer, when being totally sold out to God, you can’t do what you want to do any longer because your life is not your own.

“You have been bought with a price,” said Gibson. “Although temptations may come from time to time, and you feel like giving up, say to God, ‘Lord tie my hands, so I won’t do anything crazy; Tie my feet, so I won’t go anywhere outside of your will; and blindfold me, so I won’t be afraid of where you are leading me; and lead me on.”

The lyrics he said were inspired by a message that the Lord had given him to share with the church family.

As he awaits his next assignment, looking back, three people he said that have been inspirational to him who have motivated him to persevere include his wife, Paul, and his spiritual father, Bishop Jonathan Carey.

Gibson who has as degree in electrical installation, also did biblical studies at Pneuma Bible Institute, Grand Bahama, Assemblies of God Bible College, and Isaiah University.

Tickets for Gibson’s farewell banquet can be had by contacting Cindy Johnson at (242) 375-9865 or Lana Sawyer at 806-1840.

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