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Curry found his form at the CARIFTA Games

GEORGE TOWN, Cayman Islands – After struggling to find his form all season long, Adrian Curry got it going at the right time, peaking at the 48th CARIFTA Games which wrapped up on Monday at the Truman Bodden Sports Complex, in George Town, Cayman Islands.

Curry, the open century silver medalist from a year ago, led two Bahamians into the under-20 boys 100 meters (m) final at the CARIFTA Games on Saturday. He won his heat and qualified for the final with the third-fastest time, 10.70 seconds. Rico Moultrie also made the final, finishing second in his heat and qualifying for the final with the sixth fastest time, 10.83 seconds.

They ran 10.42 and 10.50 in the final respectively for third and fourth – personal best times for both.

“I felt pretty good about my race. I didn’t get a good start but I finished strong,” said Curry.

Over in the under-20 girls 100m, Jaida Knowles finished a close third in her heat and qualified for the final with the fourth-fastest time, running 11.85 seconds. She ran 11.79 seconds in the final for fifth.

“This is my third CARIFTA so I know what it is to have tough competition,” said Knowles. “I knew I had to execute and the race went pretty well for me.”

Starting things off for The Bahamas in the short sprints was Anthaya Charlton. She easily won her semifinal heat and qualified for the under-17 girls 100m final with the fastest time, setting a new personal best of 11.69 seconds. She lowered that personal best even further in the final, recording a time of 11.51 seconds.

“I don’t think I got out like I planned to, but it was a good race for me,” said Charlton after her race in the semis.

In the under-17 boys 100m, Davon Johnson qualified for the final with the seventh-fastest time. He was third in his heat and qualified seventh in 11.26 seconds. The other Bahamian in the under-17 boys 100m, Mateo Smith, was third in his heat and finished 11th overall in 11.36 seconds. Johnson went on to run 11.07 seconds in the final for seventh.

Javonya Valcourt qualified for the 400m final in the under-17 girls division. She was second in her heat and qualified sixth overall in 56.79 seconds. She went on to run 57.09 in the final for seventh. The other Bahamian in that event wasn’t so fortunate. Collinique Farrington was fifth in her heat and finished 11th overall in 59.51 seconds.

Just one athlete qualified for the under-17 boys 400m final. Wendall Miller was second in his heat and qualified for the final with the third-fastest time, 49.54 seconds. He went on to win the gold medal in the final in a huge personal best of 48.45 seconds. Tergenus Lovinski was fifth in his heat and finished 11th overall in 53.54 seconds.

The Bahamas had two qualifiers for the under-20 girls 400m final. Marissa White was second in her heat and had the second-fastest qualifying time for the final, running 54.85 seconds. Megan Moss, the CARIFTA champion from the under-17 girls division from a year ago, was second in her heat and qualified for the final with the fourth-fastest time, 55 seconds flat. They ran 54.30 and 54.31 for fourth and fifth respectively in the final.

Terrance Jones had a sensational run in the heats of the under-20 boys 400m, recording a personal best time of 47.51 seconds. He won his heat and qualified for the final with the fourth-fastest time. Jones went on to win the gold medal in the final for The Bahamas and recorded the second-fastest time in the world this year for an under-18 athlete, 46.29 seconds. The other Bahamian in the under-20 boys 400m, Marckenson Joseph, was fourth in his heat and finished 11th overall in 48.32 seconds.

“I feel great. I went out there, executed my race plan and trusted in God. I was able to come through,” said Jones.

All eight guys in the final ran 48 seconds or faster in the heats.

Initially, organizers had planned for three rounds of both the 100 and 200m, but because of a lack of participants, those events were reduced to two-round events – semifinals and finals.

Sitting in for Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Lanisha Rolle, fellow minister Frankie Campbell said that the Government of The Bahamas is fully behind the Bahamian junior athletes.

“It is important for our team to know that they have the governmental support at the highest level. We want our team to always be in the best condition to compete, mentally and physically, and that is one of the reasons for the Bahamasair chartered flight – so that they didn’t have to worry about delays, and connecting flights and layovers,” said Minister Campbell. “Our athletes continue to punch above their weight. We are aware of the quality of athletes who come from CARIFTA and end up in the Olympics, so we are looking for some athletes to blossom from this, and they will be celebrated.”

Team Bahamas held a full workout session on Good Friday, and came out blazing on Saturday and Sunday.

The Bahamas won six gold medals on Saturday and added three more on Sunday. The Bahamas won six gold medals in total last year.

Sheldon Longley

Sports Editor at The Nassau Guardian
Sheldon Longley joined The Nassau Guardian in January 2001 as a sports reporter. He was promoted to sports editor in 2008. Sheldon has an extensive background in sports reporting. He covered three Olympic Games and three world championships, along with multiple smaller regional and local games.
Education: College of The Bahamas, Associates in Accounting
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