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Court hears sentencing arguments for wife killer

A man who killed his wife will learn on May 22 how long he will spend in prison for the crime.

Alton Miller, who has been diagnosed with a psychotic disorder, was originally charged with murder for the 2015 death of his wife, Tiffany, but pleaded guilty to manslaughter due to his impaired mental responsibility.

Miller, a Jamaican with permanent residence, strangled his wife and set their home in Kemp Road afire. He then walked to the Wulff Road Police Station and told them what he had done.

His deceased wife had been burned beyond recognition and had to be identified through DNA.

During arguments before Acting Chief Justice Vera Watkins yesterday, Miller’s lawyer, Sonia Timothy, suggested that a sentence of 10 years was appropriate.

Timothy said that Miller did not waste the court’s time and had not gotten into any trouble during the four years he had spent on remand.

Timothy cited a case where a policeman, who killed his wife in front of their children, was sentenced to 15 years after he was convicted of manslaughter following a trial to demonstrate that courts deviate from the 18 to 35-year sentencing recommendation if there are exceptional circumstances.

The prosecutor, Roger Thompson, said that if the court wanted to deviate for the sentencing guidelines it should impose a sentence of 50 years after citing the case where the Court of Appeal substituted a murder conviction for one of manslaughter.

Thompson said that Miller was a danger to society as he was still exhibiting psychotic tendencies, despite receiving treatment.

For this reason, Thompson said that Miller was unlikely to be rehabilitated.

Thompson said Miller deprived his three young children of the “love and comfort of a mother”.

 

Artesia Davis

Senior Reporter at The Nassau Guardian
Artesia primarily covers court stories, but she also writes extensively about crime.
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