Friday, Nov 22, 2019
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A false sense of social sobriety

Dear Editor,

A seething undercurrent of anxieties are simmering in the belly of our communities, as Bahamians grasp at straws of reality to make some sense of this discontent brought upon us by gross political ineptitude over the last 50 years, but this FNM administration takes the cake.

Firstly though, let us pause for a moment of prayerful silence to thank God for his merciful provision of life, while we offer condolences to the many families who suffered tragic loss as we seek to better plan, rebuild and restore our communities and lives in the whispering ebb of Hurricane Dorian.

But, confront we must the graphic truth that has laid bare a decades-in-the-making dilemma, namely illegal migration and its sibling ill – shantytowns – that has been shaped to purest imperfection by years of national tolerance, official duplicity and weak legislative insight.

We are gripped in the clenches of troubling times where sharp scrutiny by nature and history daily dissect social issues, exposing multiple layers of neglect, incompetence and a festering sore of corrupt practices, at the very core of our civil and public services sector.

Coming out of the quiet revolution with a thrust of widespread ethnic freedom and economic diversity, a new scope of inclusive participation was aimed for; however, this auspicious plan was aborted when we got caught in the middle of a nefarious, fever-pitch cocaine trade war. Then came the pretentious assertion of one Brian Ross, accusing The Bahamas of being a nation for sale.

Despite an intransigent leadership team and some perceived verity to the matter, we prepared to launch a concerted defense of our country. Have we not learned? In light of recent, various allegations regarding multiple marriage scams, visa fraud, JPs and immigration officers?

Dubious deed polls, all that could easily taint our constitutional process of citizenship.

What say you; do we sit idly by and let our country be pilfered piece by piece, while contending with manipulative land grabs and questionable monopolies given to elite conglomerates who usually control the bid?

Is the investment of our future set to become merely a traded commodity?

These injustices toward the most vulnerable among us might not be reconciled in the lifetime of the next generation, while elsewhere, democracy is being threatened with impunity and subtle intent.

The verbose speaker of Parliament continues to fire verbal salvos across the bow of ‘the Fourth Estate’. Watch out for a loose cannon. These juvenile tirades sink to a new low and leave a bad taste in the FNM’s mouth, yet they refuse to speak up.

Fortunately, we are blessed with a free, liberal, fearless and forward-thinking press entrenched in our beloved Bahamas.

On another front, we stand with institutional strength, resolute against any person who falsely accuses us.

We have been more than hospitable to all and sundry. No lawbreakers who breach our sovereign borders or incite disorder within same, will be taken lightly or kindly to; just invite yourselves to leave or stand to be evicted by the courts. Period.

This is our country guarded by a vibrant democracy, of which those who bitterly complain, share in likewise.

We reject the perforated argument that ‘everyone here is from somewhere else’. It holds no water and fails to disclose that Bahamians did not migrate here through an illegal and criminal enterprise nor came we as recipients of a mutual economic partnership.

We extend our empathy to all, but these islands are the just, rightful and divine inheritance of this indigenous people and we humbly ask others to respect it in good moral accord.

Then, far out in left-field, we have self-anointed lawyers exhibiting disdain (that borders on contempt) toward our laws while twisting the arm of a noble judiciary.

But their agenda is erected on the premise of a flawed theory as they tie the court’s umbilical cord into a messy tangle of ‘Gordian’ knots. Inconceivably, they continue to break the scab from a healing wound, thus hurting the ones under their defense in a blatant act of ‘de mal en pis’. But a fool all by himself is still in bad company. Remember, the eminent thinker Plato implores ‘we should fear slavery more than death’, Ibid. p. 386.

We are in the midst of forgiving ourselves for being stubbornly ill-prepared for the cataclysmic upheavals climate change will bring.

Thanks to the FNM, organized confusion became the collective response of our bureaucratic body. Must we again wait for tragedy to be the catalyst effecting drastic but pertinent improvements to our social structure and political system? Our best thinking has brought us to this point. We are in a state of denial and refuse to take responsibility for our many mistakes.

In conclusion, as we retreat to comfortable armchairs in cozy dens, I confer the highest esteem upon the late Dr. Myles Munroe, and recognize his astute knowledge in translating the language of vision. It is invincible wisdom that lies cannot penetrate. By and large, this poignant and irreversible subject of nation-building will be the fulcrum to which every other issue must obey and upon it turn, in this forthcoming sizzling election season. God willing.

– Gregory W. Neely

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