Sunday, Dec 15, 2019
HomeNewsClarke: Headway being made in shantytown cleanup

Clarke: Headway being made in shantytown cleanup

Thousands of residents in The Mudd and Pigeon Peas communities in Marsh Harbour, Abaco, were left homeless following the passing of Category 5 Hurricane Dorian. FILE

The Mudd is nearly 30 percent cleaned up and Pigeon Peas nearly 100 percent, according to National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) Disaster Relief and Reconstruction Committee Chairman John Michael Clarke.

Clarke added that eight additional contractors, who are cleaning up the debris at those sites, were on the ground as of last week.

“We also moved some containers into Green Turtle Cay,” said Clarke.

“So, some headway is being made with the clean-up efforts on the island of Abaco.

“You know, there’s always discussion of [the process] not going fast enough, but it’s a disaster. You can never move fast enough, but we are trying to apply as much resources as possible so that we can do it a little more efficiently, and get people back [on the island].”

Hurricane Dorian decimated large swaths of Abaco and Grand Bahama in early September.

Hundreds of Abaco residents were evacuated from the island, many of them to New Providence.

A Category 5 hurricane, Dorian left behind a gargantuan debris field, ripping mature trees from the ground, upending 40-foot containers, boats and cars and smashing homes to bits and pieces.

Clarke added that the committee originally anticipated to be done between 120 and 180 days post-Dorian, however, he said there have been some hindrances along the way.

“The public spaces is not the problem,” said Clarke.

“It’s the private residences where the protocols are a little bit different, but that’s why we did the additional eight debris removal contractors last week so that we could continue to focus on the residential area and attend to those with a little more expedience.”

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