Sports

Higgs looking forward to post-collegiate career

Bahamian Lashann Higgs, a former female collegiate basketball player at the University of Texas at Austin, said she’s remaining optimistic after not being drafted into the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) this April.

The energetic two-guard for the Texas Longhorns ended her tenure with the team this year, bouncing back from a year in which she was sidelined with a season-ending anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in her left knee. Wearing a brace on her reconstructed knee, she averaged 9.0 points, 3.5 rebounds and 1.3 assists per game in her final season this year. For her career, Higgs averaged 9.4 points, 3.2 rebounds and 1.7 assists per game, and helped lead the Longhorns to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Women’s Basketball Tournament for four straight seasons. They reached the Elite Eight in 2016, and the Sweet 16 in back-to-back years of 2017 and 2018.

Higgs, 24, had her best year as a junior in 2017-2018. That year, she started all 35 games for the Longhorns, and averaged 12.8 points, 3.3 rebounds and 2.7 assists per game. It was in the fourth game of the 2018-2019 season when she suffered the ACL injury.

“I am proud of everything that I have accomplished and God has blessed me tremendously to be able to compete in college and earn a college degree. I am proud that I was able to accomplish that feat,” said Higgs. “I would like to continue playing for as long as possible, but you never know what path God would lead you to. Everything that took place happened for a reason so I’ll just have to trust that God has my best interest in store for me.”

Higgs said going overseas to play professionally is certainly an option for her, but for now, given the nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, she’s simply working out at home and trying to stay basketball sharp for any opportunities that are available to her. Higgs hails from Harbour Island, but lives with her adopted parents in Austin, Texas.

She has the reputation of being a dynamic and energetic guard who took a step back with her ACL injury in 2018. Prior to that injury, she was certainly on pace to become just the third Bahamian to be drafted into the WNBA.

“For now, everything is on hold due to the coronavirus, but I have been working out, running and trying to stay fit and in shape. I still have school work to finish until May but that’s about it,” she said. “Over here, we are expected to practice social distancing. I have been working out but all gyms and areas that can keep people in close proximity were shut down. I’m just trying to stay optimistic.”

Higgs said she was a little disappointed at not being drafted at first but prayed about it and became at ease with the path God has put her on. She said she’s just taking it one day at a time and will, accept whatever God has in store for her. Higgs has a message for young aspiring female players from The Bahamas.

“I would like to say that, always try to keep your dream alive no matter what. Keep pushing and keep fighting. It might not be easy but you can get through it. Trust God and believe,” she said.

Higgs earned a degree in Youth & Community Studies last year and will complete her schoolwork this May. She said should the travel restrictions into the country be lifted, she will look to return home to Harbour Island this summer.

In a shortened season due to the presence of the COVID-19 pandemic, Higgs and the Longhorns finished third in the Big 12 Conference with a 19-11 win-loss record, 11-7 Big 12. Both the Big 12 Tournament and the NCAA Tournament were cancelled.

Higgs said she feels healthy and is looking forward to a post-collegiate career in basketball. The sky is the limit for the Harbour Island native, regarded as one of the most talented female basketball players to ever come out of The Bahamas.

Show More

Sheldon Longley

Sheldon Longley joined The Nassau Guardian in January 2001 as a sports reporter. He was promoted to sports editor in 2008. Sheldon has an extensive background in sports reporting. He covered three Olympic Games and three world championships, along with multiple smaller regional and local games.

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please support our local news by turning off your adblocker